christinesrant, Entertainment, Horror, Sci-fi, Science Fiction, Television, TV-series

Intruders. A Plea from the most Abject of Fans.

After watching the first episode of Intruders, I instantly tweeted about it. I was excited!

A few episodes into it, I find myself becoming more and more a fan but at the same time increasingly frightened that it is a relationship not worth investing in.

This is my plea to BBC America.

Please, please do not fuck Intruders  up.

It might be the best sci-fi/mystery thing out there!
On this side of LOST, anyway.

Please keep it within the 90’s feel that was established in the first episode.

Within american gothic fiction.

With acclaimed TV-series like Twin Peaks,  X-Files  and the rightly named but perhaps to early forgotten TV-series American Gothic.

Do not screw it up by regurgitating LOST.

I beg of you!

True Detective successfully walked down the winding road towards an american gothic feel. The viewers stayed true through the madness.

Do not hide anything in fear of us not wanting to watch the next episode.

We are not children.

We know the monsters are real.

We do not need them explained.
Or psychoanalysed.

Keep it simple, mysterious, dark, gritty, surreal, personal. And relish in the darkness.

But most of all keep us clued-in.

If I even feel a faint whiff of LOST  (wow, I really DO have a problem with it. Read more here) during this series, I will walk away.

To never return.

Christine

 

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christinesrant, Entertainment, Genre, Literary genre, Literature, Movie genre, Movies, TV-series, Uncategorized

Tolkien did not invent fantasy but he may have ruined it.

I heard somewhere that Tolkien is to epic fantasy what Jimi Hendrix is to rock music. Now, I love rock music and I call myself a Hendrix fan.

I like fantasy but strangely enough, I am not that into Tolkien.

It might be me.
Seriously, I can be at fault here.

Epic Fantasy (also known as High Fantasy) has become commercially successful. It is recycled endlessly; movies, TV-series, novels, games. You cannot escape it.

Ultimately, you cannot escape Tolkien.

Tolkien did not invent elves, goblins and dwarves. However, his vision of them has almost replaced their origin.

It has also left a curse behind. The curse of staying true to the traditions of epic fantasy, unwilling to bring something new to it.

Why does nobody accuse Tolkien of stealing material?
Not that I want to go into a discussion on Originality.
I am just saying.

At the same time, modern fantasy (after Tolkien) and its complexities and moral ambivalence has more in common with the grittier and darker fantasy genre (Low Fantasy) than that of Tolkien. He is much more a ‘black and white – and nothing in between’ type.

He is also a bit of a prude.

Modern fantasy is therefore more in the traditions of the pulpy weird fantasy from the US, beginning in the 1920s and 30s with its amorality, nudity, violence and gore. I.e. novelists such as Robert E. Howard (Conan the Barbarian) and Fritz Leiber (Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser) at the front.

Where am I at fault?

Is it a highbrow issue? I usually go for the underdog.
Is it a popular notion? I like what I like. Going against the flow as a default setting.

Does it simply come down to what I like?

In that case, I like my fantasy personal, dark, dirty and naked.

Christine

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Entertainment, Literature, Movies, TV-series

When fantasy is fantasy, and not science fiction. (Or, why I am a Trekker first, and a Star Wars fan second.)

Rejoyce! The Star Wars VII cast has been announced!

On that note, is Star Wars science fiction or fantasy?

Science fiction deals with imaginative content. So does fantasy.
Science fiction depicts other worlds, past, parallel,
present, future or alternative. So does fantasy.
Science fiction explores literary themes like morality and social structure. So does fantasy.

The difference between them is (or is it?) that the imaginary elements within sci fi are possible within science, although they still are pure speculation. There is however, a pretense of realism.

So no magic, no good or evil. No wizards, vampires, ruby slippers, shapeshifting or Middle Earth.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) is recognized as one of the first works of science fiction. It also spurred the weird fiction genre, or what we now recognize as horror.

However, what happens when vampires are explained through science, i.e. medical mumbo-jumbo? Like in I am Legend from 2007. Vampires per se are creatures of fantasy.

In I, Frankenstein from 2014, Frankenstein (a creature of science) must involuntarily fight with Angels poorly dressed as Gargoyles against hordes of Demons in a crazy mash up of science and magic.

None the wiser?

I seem to prefer sci fi, although Harry Potter is much better as a wizard than he would be as a lab-assistant.

Conclusively, Star Trek is sci fi and Star Wars is fantasy.

It is simply a Force thing.

Christine

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