Bipolar disorder, christinesrant, community, Discrimination, Entertainment, Genre, Mental disorders, Mental Health, Mental Illness, Prejudice, Rant, Television, TV, TV-series

How Many Crazy People Do You Need? A Box set.

Did somebody loose the key to the loony bin?

It seems like every show on TV these recent years consists of one or several crazy people. Usually solving things.

Some of them are known to us as Superheroes. As if that makes everything alright! Sorry, this rant is not about supes. Or is it?

I am not here to put labels, but as one who wants awareness, I am curious about how mental health issues are expressed or implied on mainstream TV-shows. What is this interest in the psychotic yet helpful?

Why is it almost always connected to behaving as a douchebag?
Does mental illness/high intelligence give a free pass to behave as a dick?

Is it just another bad boy (needs saving) trope, a fixation on the Eccentric, or just another tribute to the Genius?

Or are they in fact the new superheroes, their issues often described as talents and gifts in an almost supernatural sense. A common man hero, sort of. More common than the common man becoming a superhero, that is.

Or is it a poorly concealed, yet bogus pat on the shoulder to all fighters out there, living, enduring or barely holding on.

Cue: Heroes by Alesso ft. Tove Lo.

Some of the shows are following this trend head on. I have made a compilation rant of them. I might have missed some. I might have ignored some.

House M.D. (2004-2012)
Honestly, I have not seen enough of this show to say anything meaningful about it. But then again, there might not be any meaning to it at all. I have however seen enough to make highly astute guesses. Because lets be honest, every episode is the same one.

House is being an asshole but occasionally he shows a couple of seconds of remorse or goodwill. Enough to like him, or at least accept his bullshit. Not to forget; he saves life!

His superpower: He can medic-babble for 40 minutes.

Dexter (2006-2013)
I saw perhaps half of the first season back in 2006 so I am really just shooting blanks here.

As I remembered it, it was no confusion to the fact that Dexter is mental, but he was not an unsocial jerk. He just could not stop killing (bad) people. How people would sit through this for seven years is beyond me.

His superpower: a never ending supply of duct tape and plastic wrapping.

Monk (2002-2009)
Adrian Monk is the human personification of OCD, complete with 312 fears and phobias. The show is comedic in its form but portrayed with so much love you are compelled to see his beauty.

His superpower: Did I mention he has 312 fears? It is a miracle he gets out of bed in the morning!

Bones (2005-)
It is implied that forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance “Bones” Brennan has Asperger’s.

I have only seen an episode here and there, but I get the impression that she comes of as a strong female lead in spite of her challenges. Flawed but lovable.

Bones superpower: When she points a finger out in the air, a three-dimensional graph or other medical image pops up, showing someone’s insides.

Homeland (2011-)
Carrie Mathison is another strong female lead on TV. I am immensely impressed by the portray of bipolar disorder in the first season of Homeland.

Carrie is very good at what she does, but her strengths are also her weaknesses. It deserves a better mention than just a paragraph in a compilation rant, so I am writing a whole post on her, but this is all I got for now.

Her superpower: A never-ending supply of highlight markers in different colors.

Perception (2012-2015)
This investigating duo consists of a flat Rachael Leigh Cook and a scrubby heterosexual Will  from Will&Grace, complete with flannels and a 3-day beard.

His mental health problems are first referred to as visions, incidents, then goes on to be called conditions, schizophrenic hallucinations and finally recognized as Paranoid Schizophrenia.

Not a good show. However, portraying the different phases of his illnesses is very good although oversimplified.

Superpower: His hallucinations are just as smart as him.

Elementary (2012-)
This show  tries to remake Sherlock (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) in a more modern version. By moving him to the US, giving him some AA advice and a female Watson. Not to forget, a female Moriarty. You know you are witnessing post-modern stuff when half the characters change their gender. It is however, worth watching because of the cast.

Sherlock’s superpower: Animal companion: Clyde the turtle.

The Following (2013-2015)
A change from the other shows, The Following does not have a psycho investigator. Ryan Hardy might suffer from different disorders he self-medicates with alcohol and self-sacrifice, but it is this shows antagonist Joe Carroll that is the crackpot. Although I believe his followers must be even crazier because this cult leader is as charismatic as a wall-to-wall carpet.

Why someone would follow this man, and why people would watch this, is still an enigma to me. Perhaps that is Carroll’s superpower.

The Blacklist (2013-)
Yet another crime/drama/mystery worth mentioning. Reddington is leading agents around in a maze, not sure when he will turn on them or not. Is he psychotic, desperate, fatherly or only out for revenge? Is he an intuitive genius or has he staged everything from the beginning?

Reddingtons superpower: No one beats him at party planning.

Scorpion (2014-)
If one genius is not lovable enough, why would you bring in some more? Now we have a whole band of them. Are they mental or just unpleasant? This is a relative new instalment of the “crazy and obnoxious helping the happy (?) untalented”. This show lost me just a couple of episodes in.

Superpower: Instant WiFi access.

The Bridge (2013-)
This one is on my to-watch-list. In fact, all of the versions are on it. You have the Swedish/Danish original Broen, the US version The Bridge at the border to Mexico, and the UK version The Tunnel between UK and France.

Sonya Cross (US) seems like a flawed and strong female protagonist. I have read somewhere that she is supposed to have Asperger’s but it is never explained during the show. Anyway, I am looking forward to checking this one out.

Hannibal (2013-2015)
This is also on my-to-watch-list, but is it yet another version of the crazy leading the blind?

It is based on the novel Red Dragon (Thomas Harris, 1981) about our favorite cannibal Hannibal Lecter. What is not to love?

Christine

If you have questions about mental health issues, please contact your national and/or local mental health organizations and clinics.

Advertisements
Standard
christinesrant, Discrimination, Entertainment, Feminism, gender, Prejudice, sexism, Television, TV, TV-series, Women empowerment

Covert Affairs. Not So Covertly Discrimination Against Women.

My first reaction to Covert Affairs was this:

I have now finished the 1st season and let me be clear; I am horrified!

Annie Walker, a young sexy female CIA trainee is handpicked and fast-tracked suddenly finding herself Operative.

This could have been a funny twist on the sexy female agent trope. Perhaps that was what they were going for but let me tell you why and how they fail. Miserably.

Introduced as a pretty tomboy, Annie quickly evolves into Action Junkie Barbie.

When called in by a (male) CIA/military trainee officer, she awkwardly blabbers on admitting to sleeping with her taekwondo instructor. Which btw, is not against the rules. She has already checked.

In a couple of seconds, she is transformed into a geeky-girl-next-door type who knows how to google.

The CIA clears her after interviewing her with a series of questions about her sex life. We now know her beach relationship with ex Ben Mercer ended ugly, she is fluent in six languages and she likes to wear outrageous cleavages. It is a good thing her breast barely manages an A-cup or it would be boobies all over the place!

She comes off as a man-eater as we see her flirt with Conrad, a man she just met on the steps of her new CIA home. Who, in all honesty, is flirting with her.

Her awkwardness is yet again apparent when she tries to walk through security without her passkey. Switching her from sexy confident to silly and girly.

Here lays the secret to what I hoped this show would be like.

Already we have seen Annie as confident, silly, headstrong, naïve, determined, awkward, sexual, weak, smart, emotional and strong. Not completely one-dimensional.

It gives me hope.
However, there are signs I do not like.

Her commanding officer points out that she is the best driver of any women the CIA academy (?) ever have had. WTF?!

And, Conrad is goading her to make the no-passkey mistake.

The bureau needs Annie because she can pass as a hooker. Seemingly, as the only other woman in this department, Annie’s female boss gives her this assignment. As if that makes everything all right!

Her boss is another example of the sexist craftsmanship of the writers. She cannot trust her unfaithful husband, and continues to interrupt his business meetings throughout the entire season trying to shame him in front of others. Resulting in high bitch levels herself.

Auggie, a blind agent now acting as the geeky IT guy and obviously the romantic lead in this show, he cannot judge her by her looks. He has instead perfected the skill of listening to how other men talk to women to find out if they are sexy or not.

Back to Annie.

She flirts wherever she goes. It is her secret weapon but is seriously rattled when finding that her contact guy is an ugly middle-aged man, and she frowns at the ordinary looking man her sister sets her up with. Not giving it a chance in hell.

Instead of CIA mentoring her so she slowly gets better at what she does, everybody seems to be goading her and then laughs or yells at her for not doing her job well. Her ex being the only actual reason she is there.

She screams like a girl, cannot walk in those high-heeled Louboutins as if her life depended on it, and is manipulated by everyone around her.

At one point, her ex and her new loverboy bickers about how to best keep her safe, while she is there. Doing nothing.

Every episode ends with her being rescued by a man. She tries to fight but is defeated every fucking time.

In the second episode, just to be certain we get how womanly weak she is, she is equipped with a panic/rape alarm and pepper spray. Emphasizing her (gender) as a victim.

When Annie’s only female to look up to, her boss, gets the career opportunity of taking her husband’s job, making her the highest-ranking woman in the history of the CIA and do an amazing job at it.

In spite of all her confrontations with her husband, she turns the offer down willing to fight with him (instead of against) keeping their marriage true.

Is this actually an accurate portrait of a working woman in the patriarchy? Especially working in a male-oriented workplace?

Because when ex Mercer romantically asks Annie to change her ticket the next day, all I hear is, “Please sacrifice everything for me! As a man I cannot, but you are only a woman. You can.”

Christine

Standard
christinesrant, community, Entertainment, Feminism, gender, gender identity, Television, TV-series

Orphan Black. Kicking Nature’s Ass.

The Canadian TV-series Orphan Black has taken audiences and a bunch of critics with storm. It is renewed for a third season airing in 2015.

I admit I was sceptic in the beginning.

As I watched episode two and onwards I got over the Ringer copycat thing and started to really enjoy the clone story. It is nothing like Ringer, you just need to get past the first episode.

The first season is okay. Some cool tweaks but the genius part is solemnly Tatiana Maslany’s  fault. The second season is much like the first one, not introducing enough clones though.

The abbreviated summary full of spoilers is this: There are these clones, right. In the beginning they do not know but through hula hoops of coincidents, true detectiving and a suicide, they or at least some of them discover each other and their true origin.

Which is the same gene pool.
Perhaps even an international adoption agency. The details are a little bit blurry about that.

The clones played by Maslany only look alike. Which is not THAT difficult since the same actress plays them all.

Their personalities however are very different. Due to their upbringing.

Classic Nurture vs. Nature.

The interesting part is that their differences does not stop at simple personality traits but also in their sexual identity and orientation. Including one being a lesbian and one a transgendered/transsexual male.

Are you born heterosexual or is that a choice? Choice, in this case being a very complicated concept.

I do get why pro-gay right activists still cling to the “I (They) am (are) born this way” argument although I find it archaic. Their demands on equal rights not diminished by it not being their nature.

Although it is more likely that it is a combination of the two and not versus, this show has made a stand. At least made a statement.

It is enough for me to find it refreshing.

Christine

 

 

 

Standard
christinesrant, Entertainment, Family, Feminism, gender, Genre, Television, TV-series

Mom. The Perfect Family.

I am a huge fan of the family sitcoms like Raising Hope and Modern Family.

They both portrait family as a non-homogeneous group of individuals defined by their good and their bad qualities. Not perfect families.

Of the two I recommend Raising Hope.

It is a highly non-functioning family portrayed with so much love and kindness that the Pritchett/Tucker-Pritchett/Dunphy-alliance, although both gay and multicultural, comes out as just petty.

Although both MF and RH is a tad goodie two-shoes, it seems that a “in your face” type of humor is seeping through many new comedies lately.

Humor so explicit it is only comparable to the cumshot in porn.
2 Broke Girls  is an example.

I am no prude. I enjoy 2BG immensely!

Then I saw an episode of the sitcom Mom.

I never found Anna Faris funny in the Scary Movie franchise.
Which I also did not like. Must be all the poop jokes.

However, I respect Allison Janney  immensely.

Where 2BG mostly joke about sex, Mom joke about fucking up life with drugs and alcohol but mostly fucking up your children’s life for the same reasons.

It is somewhat trashy. I can handle that.

Between the three generations portrayed, there is so much psychological and emotional abuse, and child neglect; it just gives me an iffy taste in the mouth.

I did not laugh through the whole season. I was uncomfortable all the way.

Then it strikes me.

Perhaps this is exactly why this show is worth watching?

It is honest.

It portrays flawed and somewhat broken females struggling to redeem themselves as individuals, as women, mothers and as a family.

Most importantly, they do it without judgment.

Christine

Standard
christinesrant, Entertainment, Feminism, TV-series, Uncategorized

The Lie I cannot live with. And the One I can.

Sometimes when I really enjoy a movie or a TV-series, I browse the message boards and reviews on IMDb. I know I should not but sometime funny stuff appear.

Sometimes not.

Finished with season 3 of Miranda, a sit-com by and with Miranda Hart, an English comedian and actress, I boldly went through its message boards.

One of the reviews ticked me off.

The review starts off very nicely with its title: “Excellent comedy” but it all goes down from there and after the second sentence I am not bothered reading the rest.

“pythonman-1” (from Belgium apparently) states:
“To tell the truth, there are not many female comedians that can make me laugh. This is not a sexist opinion, it is just not my type of humor.”

Of course, it is a sexist opinion.

You would not emphasize the FEMALE part or the IT IS NOT MY TYPE OF HUMOR part if it were not sexist. Sexist opinions is the definition of gender discrimination.

You might not have meant it that way.

Sod it. I do not care.

According to what you just stated, you do not enjoy the one and almighty humor of women, the one that all women have in common but that, lucky for you Miranda sways away from so you could get yourself a little laugh.

So, to the lie I can live with.

I am assuming you are a man.
Good luck finding a girlfriend that can make you laugh.

Christine

Standard